My Power Of Attorney

Angus Health and Social Care Partnership is supporting the National Power of Attorney Campaign

It is never too soon to think about what you would like to happen if you become ill, or if your illness gets worse. There are certain practical steps that everyone should take when thinking about planning for the future and arranging a Power of Attorney is one of these. Planning ahead in this way will make the financial, legal and practical consequences of illness for families much easier to deal with.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/343185374
More information can be found over at the My Power Of Attorney website.

Advice from Claire Milne, Post Diagnostic Dementia Social Worker, Angus Health and Social Care Partnership:

Read some of the stories below which we have collected

After I attended an NHS awareness session on the benefits of Power of Attorney, my wife and I agreed to arrange POAs for each other. As it so happened, sometime later, my wife developed Alzheimer’s with a rapid progression rate. I was able to deal with my wife’s finances and, as we had also arranged Welfare POA, the placement into long term care was made easier. This was already such a distressing and emotionally challenging time for the family, so at least we were all spared any lengthy and stressful legal procedures and we were able to focus on the well-being of my wife and our family.

I would urge anyone, no matter what age, to get POA organised as
early as possible. It needs to be organised when things are going well, as it
may be too late or very difficult to do it in the middle of a future crisis. I
can’t imagine how much more dreadful our situation would have been without it.

A. Jack, Service User Representative, Angus Integration Joint
Board

I was really pleased I took the advice from a good friend to organise the power of attorney document while my husband was in a sound mind to fully understand what he was doing.
I have not actually used the power of attorney in any capacity yet apart from showing the document to doctors and welfare persons, however, it is extremely helpful to know it is in place. When my husband was hospitalised it was very stressful and having the power of attorney already in place took some of the stress away. The power of attorney is a very important document to have. It is vital that the ‘granter’ is taken care of in all aspects, if they do not have the capacity to do so themselves. The document gives the ‘attorney’ the legal responsibility to achieve this.

A. Relative

In 2018 my father-in-law was independent, living alone and kept well. He was 82 years of age. By the end the year he had become frailer and was struggling with getting outside, doing his housework and shopping. He was still able to care for himself and was mentally fit and able. The family suggested to him he should get a POA. Being practical and recognising that, at his age, the future could be uncertain, he agreed. The family spoke to him at this time about what mattered to him and what would be important to him should his health deteriorate. This included a conversation about his funeral arrangements.
By the spring of 2019 he was diagnosed with an advanced life limiting condition and his physical health was deteriorating month by month. He fell at home at the end of May 2019 and fractured his hip. The fall and operation contributed to him developing delirium and he was transferred to a Medicine for the Elderly ward for rehabilitation. He did get home for a week but he was not safe to be in his own home and he was placed in a local care home. He died in the care home very peacefully at the beginning of September 2019.
Having the POA for both care and welfare in place meant all his care and decisions were made swiftly and with ease. Without this in place it would have been difficult to plan and arrange the care and support he needed in a timely fashion. It meant for the family that we did not experience unnecessary delays in decisions regarding his care and welfare. The family knew what was important to him and how he wanted to be looked after because the POA was in place. There was no disagreement amongst family members because of previous conversations and discussions. It meant that his preferences and wishes were at the heart of the decisions that were made about his care and support.

Daughter-in-law

I was really pleased I took the advice from a good friend to organise the power of attorney document while my husband was in a sound mind to fully understand what he was doing.
I have not actually used the power of attorney in any capacity yet apart from showing the document to doctors and welfare persons, however, it is extremely helpful to know it is in place.
When my husband was hospitalised it was very stressful and having the power of attorney already in place took some of the stress away.
The power of attorney is a very important document to have. It is vital that the ‘granter’ is taken care of in all aspects, if they do not have the capacity to do so themselves. The document gives the ‘attorney’ the legal responsibility to achieve this.

Relative